Native Daughters Project featured in Hubbard Lecture

Native Daughters Project featured in Hubbard Lecture

Monday, September 29, 2014 - 7:00pm
Hubbard Lecture features Native Daughters
Hubbard Lecture features Native Daughters

The College of Journalism and Mass Communications announced its Native Daughters project was featured as part of the Hubbard Lecture on Friday, Oct. 10, at the Sheldon Museum of Art. The lecture series, titled 'First Peoples of the Plains,' will be held at 7 p.m.

On Tuesday, Oct. 14, the Omaha Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution is sponsoring a lecture by journalism professor, Joe Starita. Starita will speak about his book, “I Am a Man, Chief Standing Bear’s Journey for Justice.” He also will discuss the Native Daughters project, including recent research on Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte, the first Native American
physician. This event will be held at The Durham Museum at 10 a.m.

“It’s always an honor for the College of Journalism and Mass Communications to have the hard work of its students showcased in such a magnificent setting,” Starita said. “The richness and vitality of Native culture has been a personal passion for almost half a century and to bring it to diverse audiences is endlessly enriching.”

Native Daughters offers students the opportunity to participate in depth reporting classes and is taught by Starita and Jerry Renaud, professor of broadcasting and sequence head and Judi gaiashkibos, executive director of the Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs. These classes provide students the skills to probe deeply into a focused topic.

Native Daughters is a collection of stories, profiles and multimedia projects about a diverse group of Native American women. The first magazine and website focused on the vital role Native American women throughout the nation continue to play in their culture. It also was developed into an accompanying curriculum guide that is taught in schools across the United States.

Because of the success of the first project, a Native American woman invited the college to produce a similar project about Oklahoma tribes. Oklahoma has one of the largest Native populations in the country, second only to California.

For more information on Native Daughters, visit their website at http://cojmc.unl.edu/nativedaughters/ and http://cojmc.unl.edu/nativedaughters2/#section-1.