Gary Kebbel awarded a Fulbright Specialist Grant

Gary Kebbel awarded a Fulbright Specialist Grant

Monday, June 2, 2014 - 7:00pm
Fulbright logo
Fulbright logo

The Council for International Exchange of Scholars has awarded Gary Kebbel, a professor of journalism, a Fulbright Specialist grant. This is his second Fulbright Specialist grant award.

The Fulbright Specialist Program connects non-U.S. institutions overseas with the expertise of U.S. scholars and professionals. As a Fulbrighter, he will be joining the ranks of distinguished scholars and professionals worldwide who are leaders in the educational, political, economic, social, and cultural lives of their countries.

Kebbel will be working with the U. S. Mission to the Africa Union, a cooperative organization of 54 African nations where he will be consulting with the Africa Union on its draft strategic communication plan. Part of that work will be to advise on creating a crisis communication plan and advising on where and how to use social media as an element of these plans. 

Kebbel was a Fulbright Senior Specialist in online journalism in 2008. In that role, he worked in Pretoria, South Africa, helping the Journalism Department at Tshwane University of Technology advance its digital media curriculum. He is a member of the U.S.-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission subgroup on media. 

Kebbel’s areas of interest are mobile communications, news that engages communities and digital news and advertising experiments.

He has master’s degrees in journalism and in political science from the University of Illinois, and a master of social work degree from the Catholic University of America.

ABOUT THE FULBRIGHT SPECIALIST PROGRAM
Fulbright Specialist grants range in duration from two to six weeks. Funding is shared between the U.S. Department of State and host institutions. The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs pays for the grantee’s international travel costs and provides a payment of $200 per grant day. The host institution usually offers to cover the cost of grantee housing, meals, and any necessary program-related in-country expenses. The U.S. Government founded the international academic exchange program in 1946.